December 1, 2020

Dumbflashgames

The travel folks

The fundamentals of building business trust

7 min read

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MARQUES BROWNLEE: My name is Marques Brownlee, a.k.a.

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MKBHD on the internet, and I am a product reviewer.

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MARC PRITCHARD: Hi, I’m Marc Pritchard,

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and I am the chief brand officer, Procter & Gamble.

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I’m really, really excited about spending some time here

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and having a conversation, because I think the two of us

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can probably make some good things happen together.

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MARQUES BROWNLEE: I’ve been looking forward to it, man.

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I think we wanted to start off talking about just

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your challenges as a business.

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And I’m in the tech space, but I think

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there’s a lot of parallels, where

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you want to market the product and you also want to make as

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good of a product as possible.

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What do you find are your biggest challenges there?

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MARC PRITCHARD: Our challenge is that we

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make these everyday products that are cleaning, health,

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People use them every single day.

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They’ve got to be the absolute best.

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In addition to that, we also want

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to do good, because we reach 5 billion people

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on the planet every day with our products

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and with our advertising.

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So we want to be a force for good,

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as well as be a force for growth.

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You do a remarkable job of going behind products,

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understanding every aspect of their technology.

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When you do that, do you take into consideration

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what that company does, beyond just make that awesome product?

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MARQUES BROWNLEE: Yeah, it’s interesting.

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It can actually be a bit of a challenge

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because I’m so focused, for me, on the product that oftentimes,

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you can be a little bit blinded by the product is

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so great that I’m willing to forgive shortcomings

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of the company behind it.

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Ideally, that’s not a trade-off that a customer has to make.

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They can feel comfortable once they’re

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picking between the best set of products for them,

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knowing that they can also choose

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one that has great people, and a great message,

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and a great purpose behind it.

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Again, if you’re a company using that great product as leverage,

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you don’t want to use it to leverage the wrong way.

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You have a great product, you can get away with bad things.

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You want to use it the right way.

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There’s a unique set of products that comes to mind.

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When you’re choosing which one you want to use,

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you’re also able to think about the good

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that you can do for your environment

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as a result of using the product.

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There’s a benefit to you as a customer.

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You’re going to save money on your bill.

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But also, you can help make a better positive impact

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as a result of using this product.

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Bringing that into messaging seems like a no-brainer,

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but that’s something that I think definitely will help.

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MARC PRITCHARD: Oh, that’s interesting.

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Let me give you an example.

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Tide is an obviously great product.

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It’s been around since the 1950s.

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What they’ve done is they’ve figured out

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a way to be able to clean clothes in cold water,

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and it actually reduces the energy load

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because most of the energy for washing clothes

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is heating the water.

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So it actually reduces carbon emissions.

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Now, the other area that we’re interested in is equality.

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And we’ve got a long history of that.

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One of our core things we focus on in all of our advertising–

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the accurate portrayal of every person,

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regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation,

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gender identity, ability, religion, age.

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If the images you’re seeing are inaccurate, or stereotyped,

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or objectified, or diminished, or denigrated,

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that’s what people start seeing as reality.

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What are your thoughts on that?

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MARQUES BROWNLEE: Yeah.

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It’s kind of interesting, actually.

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It’s just male-dominated in every way,

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from the people running companies to the people

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building things, to the people buying them– from end to end.

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For me, I always started every video with, “What’s up, guys?”

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and just that little thing– you might not

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think too hard about it, but right off the bat,

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inclusion becomes something they think about when

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you start a video that way.

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So the past couple weeks, I’ve started the video with just,

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And we’ll see what that changes.

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We’ll see if I can look in the analytics

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and see more inclusive groups of people watching the videos.

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But it’s definitely a challenge in tech,

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and I think there’s a lot more I can do.

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MARC PRITCHARD: That is such an important point.

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It’s those very small points that

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make a big difference because just “what’s up,”

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you’ve now included 50% more people.

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“What’s up, guys” can definitely be perceived

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as something different.

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Olay is one of our brands, and they’ve

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got a campaign called Face Anything.

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Big part of what they’re doing is on gender equality,

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but they’re actually trying to get more women in tech.

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And so they’ve got a program where they actually

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help invest in women who code.

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And so maybe we can bring that.

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You can say, “Hey, what’s up,” and show Olay

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and what they’re doing.

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A lot of what we’re talking about here

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is the importance of building trust with the people we serve.

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With our products, we try to make sure

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that people trust our brands.

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Because we deliver what we promise,

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they know that they’re going to get a high quality product.

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But you have 12 million people who are

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connecting with you every day.

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So you’re building trust.

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And what do you think is important to make that happen?

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MARQUES BROWNLEE: Wow.

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That’s a good question.

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I think a lot of that comes to a consistency of truth.

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So if a device comes across my plate and I think it’s great,

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I’ll say it’s great.

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If I think it’s bad, I also have to say it’s bad.

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My communication with the audience

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has evolved to where my focus has

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to be to be able to explain the nuances of the tech that

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go really deep, but to bring it to a surface level

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where someone who’s not an expert in it can understand it.

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MARC PRITCHARD: There are real similarities

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in how we develop advertising.

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What I think it misses, in many cases,

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is a lot of the depth and the nuances.

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I think that YouTube is a role model.

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We have created videos that are sometimes

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three minutes that are epic.

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Most of our best, most effective ads

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around being a force for good are longer than 30 seconds.

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So people will watch it if it’s engaging.

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MARQUES BROWNLEE: That’s one thing with YouTube

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is if there is a community for it,

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there is a big community for it.

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And so not only is there a tech community,

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I’m sure there’s like a paper towel efficiency community,

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So those people are looking for that content,

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and they’re going to find it, and they’re

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going to engage at a way higher rate there than anywhere

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else probably you can find.

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So that’s the benefit for sure.

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MARC PRITCHARD: What’s the coolest product you’ve ever

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seen come out of CES?

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MARQUES BROWNLEE: I was able to do a self-driving car demo.

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And so I sat in the back seat and took

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a video of an empty front seat as this car drove me

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around a couple miles of Las Vegas.

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I think they knew, on one hand, that that would

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be really impressive to people.

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But on the other hand, they can get these genuine reactions

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of what will people really think?

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You don’t get those reactions in your lab from just testing it.

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MARC PRITCHARD: That’s what we decided to do.

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So two years ago, we kind of surprised everybody.

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People were like, why is a consumer products

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company coming here?

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We were joking around a little bit

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about or talking about the Charmin lab.

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This problem we were trying to solve

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was nobody wants to ever run out of toilet paper.

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MARQUES BROWNLEE: Fact.

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MARC PRITCHARD: So that’s back to this nuance.

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That’s the insight and the nuance.

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And what we did introduce was Freedom Roll.

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Freedom Roll is the equivalent of 24 rolls in one.

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So it’s this giant roll.

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We had thought, people aren’t going to buy this thing.

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Are they really going to do it?

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But we were shocked.

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People love it because it’s back to this,

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we knew it’s what the consumer wanted,

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which is you never want to run out.

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MARQUES BROWNLEE: If there’s any product

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you want to have a relationship with,

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it’s your Charmin and your Bounty.

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So as long as they’re doing a good job,

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I think a lot of people will be happy.

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MARC PRITCHARD: I’ve got to get you the Oral-B IO product.

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It’s not a self-driving car, but I

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think you’re going to be blown away

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by it when you get to try it.

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Well, thanks, Marques, for spending time with me.

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It was just a great conversation about life,

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about goodness, about how you can take everyday things

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and just make them interesting, and make them meaningful,

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and do it in such a way that is authentic.

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MARQUES BROWNLEE: Thanks for chatting with me, Marc.

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It’s been a lot of fun.

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Every time I get to have a conversation with someone who

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has a different perspective on not just tech, but the world,

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It’s pretty valuable.

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Thanks for watching it, and this has been Marquez Brownlee,

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